Problem identification

CULTURAL & RACIAL IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT

CHAD 202- ONLINE- WEEK 4

MONA RESSAISSI

Important? Yes….

The development of a strong ethnic, cultural and racial identity serves as a protective factor against damaging social context and subsequent negative psychological and psychosocial outcomes (Fisher et al.).

Direct links between positive and strong identity and well-being and adjustment.

You may be a custodian of a child or family’s racial and cultural identity development

Strength of Cultural Identity as Indicator

Positive Correlation is Stronger!

Higher Self-Esteem

Less Prone to Depression

Less Prone to Anxiety

Higher Rate of Adjustment

Stronger Psychosocial Performance

Stronger Academic Performance

Increased Well-being, success

Considerations

How do we develop our cultural/racial/ethnic identity?

When do we develop our cultural/racial/ethnic? identity?

Differences between white and non-white groups? Age, location, gender, values etc.?

How does this impact our cultural competence service?

HOW: Development Of Racial/Cultural Identity

Racial/Cultural identity develops as children proceed through three learning processes

1. Racial/Cultural classification ability

Children learn to accurately apply ethnic labels to members of diverse groups

2. Racial/Cultural identification

Children learn to apply a concept of race to themselves through inner dialogue

3. Racial/Cultural evaluation

Children develop feelings regarding their identity, informed by significant others and society

HOW: Development of Cultural/Racial/Ethnic Identity

EXPLORATION- RECOGNIZING CULTURES AND ACTIVELY LEARNING

2. RESOLUTION- DECSION ON THE MEANING OF

ETHNICITY AND CULTURE IN LIFE

AFFIRMATION- SELECTING AND CREATING A POSTIVE RELATIONSHIP WITH CULTURE/ETHNICITY

When = Always

Even at Birth we can see differences in temperament

Children adapt the temperamental style of their culture at an early age

Racial Identity Development may be strongest during adolescence but can be tolled by various factors

Relationship to culture, self-identity can continue throughout life, particularly with changes in environment

May be cyclical or linear (surface and sophisticated)

For instance:

N. European and Australian aboriginal babies cry more, are less easily consoled than Navajo and Chinese babies

Japanese babies are more irritable than Navajo or Chinese babies

Navajo mothers have less verbal interaction with their babies in comparison to White mothers, who talk to their babies constantly

Navajo mothers engage their children via eye contact

When: Example

Both African (AA) and White American (WA) children had highly accurate racial classification ability by age 6

By third grade, slightly more WA children than AA children identified their race

By third grade, both WA and AA children showed 80% preference for their own race

By adolescence, both had achieved 100% group-appropriate choices

Differences: Factors that may impact the process

Context

Majority vs. Minority

Uni-racial vs. multiracial

Trauma

Gender

Acculturation

Cultural Competence Work: Assessing each child’s cultural/racial identity journey

If we accept the importance on this journey and its impact, the it must follow that assessment and support of same is included in prevention, interventions, support and problem-solving.

Important culturally competence tools:

Definitions of family, differences in structure and process, promoting resiliency and empowerment.

Cultural Competence Work: The Tree of Life Exercise

Strategy to get insight into child’s self-identity and struggles:

Roots: Where the child comes from; family history, ancestry, etc.

Ground: Where they are currently living; their activities

Trunk: Skills and abilities, both work and social life

Branches: Hopes, dreams, wishes, life direction

Leaves: Important people in their life, both alive and dead

Fruit: The gifts they have received from people; love, support, etc.

Cultural Competence Work: Specific Intervention Skills

Precontact

Understanding child’s ethnicity, race, language, social class, minority status

Using professional’s own racial/ethnic differences

Problem identification

Discussing racial/ethnic differences, responding to cultural cues

Adapting to the child’s interactive style and conveying understanding and validation

Cultural Competence Work: Specific Intervention Skills

Problem specification

Identifying ecosystemic sources of the child’s problems, considering the implications of discussions about the child’s cultural reality

Problem solving

Reaffirming life skills and coping strategies, applying new strategies relevant to child’s needs, acculturation, motivation for change, and comfort level