Does she have a nipple discharge?

What additional questions should you ask the patient and why?

  • Additional questions to ask this patient would be if the lump is painful, pain in fibrocystic disease is bilateral and increases before the monthly menstruation.
  • Has the lump changed in size or remained the same, has she ever noticed a lump before, is she menstruating. Cyst gets smaller and pain decreases when the menstrual cycle starts. If the patient is menstruating it is important to have her come back at the end of her menstrual period. This is because the breast cysts can fluctuate during the menstrual cycle (So you found a lump, now what? 2015).
  • Does she have a nipple discharge? A nipple discharge that is unilateral, pink or bloody, non-milky or associated with a mass is an indicator of breast cancer.
  • Ask at what age did she begin menstruating because early menarche increases the risk of breast cancer.
  • Does she have a family history of breast cancer? If a mother or sister had breast cancer there is twice the risk and if both have it there is three times the risk of developing breast cancer.
  • Does she have any children? Null parity increases your risk of breast cancer (Seller, & Symons, 2018).

What should be included in the physical examination at this visit?

            A complete breast exam should be included in this visit. The breast lump should be assessed to determine if it is firm, with indistinct borders and if it is attached to the skin. Assessment should include if there is any dimpling or nipple retraction, and unilateral nipple discharge, all of which are a signs of breast cancer. Benign lumps usually have well-defined borders and are mobile (Sellers, & Symons, 2018).

Possible differential diagnoses at this time are as follows:

  • Breast cancerPatients that develop breast cancer with no family history are normally older than 40 years.
  • Fibrocystic breast disease-Patients have cyclic bilateral breast pain, especially near and during menstruation. The pain and tenderness worsen before menstruation.
  • Fibroadenoma- Usually presents in patients 20-40 years. Usually, a solitary lump that is firm, mobile, smooth, and rubbery (Seller, & Symons, 2018).

What tests should you order and why?

            A mammogram is the first test to order. If the mammogram is inconclusive or the breast has dense tissue then a breast ultrasound should be ordered to differentiate between a cystic mass and a solid mass. If needed a needle aspiration breast biopsy should be ordered. In some cases an MRI can be ordered, especially in high-risk patients (Sellers, & Symons, 2018).

How should this patient be managed?

            If it is fibrocystic breast disease the patient should be advised to wear a firm bra even at night. Dietary restrictions will include coffee, chocolate, and tea. The patient should also take 400 IU of vitamin E daily. If the patient is experiencing pain or moderate to severe fibrocystic breast disease, the therapeutics to prescribe are oral contraceptives, NSAIDs and/or progestin. The patient should also be educated on the importance of conducting breast self-exams monthly even though the breasts may be lumpy (Dunphy, Winland-Brown, Porter, & Thomas, 2015).

References